The HHS has provided a Coronavirus Dashboard

Real-time sharing is ubiquitous in the modern era. Fiber-optics and the internet have made the world better connected than it has ever been. Despite this, a lack of centralized organization inevitably leads to difficulties in consolidating available information into a readily available form. The U.S. Department of Health & Human Services has recently addressed this need for a streamlined solution by redirecting all hospital data to the agency itself, rather than through the CDC. The HHS has provided a Coronavirus Dashboard to serve as a singular access point for all interested parties.

a lack of centralized organization inevitably leads to difficulties in consolidating available information into a readily available form.

Innovation driven by the re-imagination of existing ideas

Ultimately, we are all human, and the relative novelty of any given idea is dwarfed by the number of simultaneous potential sources. True novelty is scarce in the modern era, and innovation is increasingly driven by the re-imagination of existing ideas. Real-time data sharing is the future. With information and communication so easily accessible, especially on the eve of AI, it only makes sense that labs should compare their findings to best serve the public need. Despite available access, one of the biggest obstacles to utilization is the inherently competitive nature of research. A great deal of effort goes in to research, and the relevant parties should still be given their due credit. A common goal such as the suppression of the coronavirus pandemic is a perfect opportunity to pave the way for future cooperation.

With information and communication so easily accessible, especially on the eve of AI, it only makes sense that labs should compare their findings to best serve the public need.

Improving throughput

The next generation of scientists is already being trained in cloud lab environments. Many existing labs are also undergoing review by small task-force teams with the purpose of identifying bottlenecks in infrastructure to improve throughput. Over the years, many organizations utilize an amalgam of technologies to address particular issues. Taking the time to reevaluate incumbent technologies and procedures allows for dramatic improvements in efficiency with the removal of redundant or ineffective modalities.

Progress in the U.S has been slower

Other nations such as China were quick to implement centralized lab dynamics to facilitate a rapid response to emerging information. Progress in the U.S has been slower, but most scientists recognize the moral imperative to share pandemic related information for the benefit of all humanity. In the words of Mark Suzman of the Gates Foundation, “If we want to make the world safe from outbreaks like COVID-19, then we need to find a way to make research and development move faster.” A huge number of observational clinical trials have been submitted to the Cochrane COVID-19 Study Register, highlighting the leaps already made in global cooperative efforts.

In the words of Mark Suzman of the Gates Foundation, “If we want to make the world safe from outbreaks like COVID-19, then we need to find a way to make research and development move faster.”

Transitioning to a global research community?

While this will be an ongoing challenge to adequately transition to a global research community, inevitably, this important step will streamline the research process to produce faster results from the research community overall. Currently highly applicable to the COVID crisis, the steps taken now to improve communication and real-time sharing of lab data will set a precedent for the future of research in how to properly share and attribute data for all parties involved. Though some concessions may have to be made regarding research and the acquisition of data, the usage of that aggregated information will provide virtually limitless opportunities for innovation.