individuals showing no symptoms infecting others?

Asymptomatic carriers can spread the virus, and it is the information that deserves the spotlight to carry out more extensive testing. Currently, one of the reasons several countries across the globe are underreporting positive COVID-19 cases may be due to asymptomatic transmission.

The early coronavirus stages suggest that asymptomatic cases were more rampant than official government authorities led people to believe. In fact, the studies are piling up about individuals who can infect other individuals without showing any symptoms.

Asymptomatic Spread

Asymptomatic carriers, however, is not a new phenomenon. Conversely, the COVID-19 itself represents a newfound pathogen. Therefore, many asymptomatic cases are causing scientific dilemma that requires wider testing to curb the spread of the virus.

The Data: There’s a Pattern

One of the lab’s testing of Iceland suggests that 50% of COVID-19 cases are asymptomatic. The unclarified and vague position of WHO on the asymptomatic carriers is also another problem.

“We don’t have the accurate answer yet,” said one of the WHO officials. However, the WHO is not dismissing the possibility of widespread asymptomatic cases. Nonetheless, it seems that the health organization is waiting to determine the frequency of contagiousness among asymptomatic carriers.

“We don’t have the accurate answer yet,” said one of the WHO officials. However, the WHO is not dismissing the possibility of widespread asymptomatic cases.

Moreover, ICMR notes that 80% of cases in India are asymptomatic. Another published study lays out the fact that 40-45% of individuals are asymptomatic. It means the COVID-19 is prone to silently spread faster in human populations across the globe than previous assumptions.

Concurrently, the UK shows the same pattern where 22% of individuals who test positive for COVID-19 are asymptomatic at the testing time. In fact, one of Italy’s towns revealed up to 40% of its individuals were asymptomatic carriers.

Contrary to misguided perception, the asymptomatic transmission is not an unusual occurrence. So far, the studies prove that it may be the chief driver of the pandemic, which means there will have to be even more rigorous detecting and testing.

Contrary to misguided perception, the asymptomatic transmission is not an unusual occurrence.

More Burden of Responsibility on Medical Labs

However, it also would more burden and emphasis on individuals who conduct testing. Initially, the CDC criteria to get tested for COVID-19 was to either have travel history to China or in-person contact with an infected person. But, that criterion is no longer applicable, and there is a good chance more mass testing will take place in the upcoming months.

What Would Extensive Testing Mean for Medical Community?

“We may be missing a big number of coronavirus cases that don’t necessarily fit into current established criteria,” said Dr. Michael Osterholm, CIDRAP director at the University of Minnesota.

Scientists should not equate a lack of evidence with the existence of evidence. Realistically, it looks like asymptomatic carriers can spread the virus efficiently that may cause another upheaval for medical professionals during the second wave of the COVID-19.

Besides, it is the unintentional nature of an asymptomatic carrier who may kiss or converse another person knowing that they are not sick. The detection of these individuals is also another issue that requires a revision of current policies.

“We may be missing a big number of coronavirus cases that don’t necessarily fit into current established criteria,” –Dr. Michael Osterholm

Conclusion

More local screening of individuals who do not show any coronavirus symptoms may become a norm in the foreseeable future. Many public health specialists insist that stealth transmissions of COVID-19 may occur in the same manner as the United States.

Practically, aggressive testing may be the wisest solution to finding out countless other infected individuals who may be unintentionally spreading the virus to others. Although there may be more infected individuals worldwide, a broadened testing approach in medical labs would help scientists learn the biology of the COVID-19 better.